Glossary and FAQs
SEO CHECKER UK
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Is Page speed important to my google ranking

The short answer is nobody ( Outside Google ) actually knows. There is all sorts of stuff out there about this and we would encourage you to do your own research. However page speed is up to your hosting, got a good hosting provider then compare your website with a like for like webpage. Remember the more your page has on it the more it has to load. If your hosting provider is cheap then compare and see if it does the job. Also remember that your site is no good if it is always ‘down’. Keep an eye on your website by using a free tool available at uptimerobot.com

Landing Page Redirects

Google Explanation Redirects trigger an additional HTTP request-response cycle and delay page rendering. In the best case, each redirect will add a single roundtrip (HTTP request-response), and in the worst it may result in multiple additional roundtrips to perform the DNS lookup, TCP handshake, and TLS negotiation in addition to the additional HTTP request-response cycle. As a result, you should minimize use of redirects to improve site performance. Here are some examples of redirect patterns: · example.com uses responsive web design, no redirects are needed - fast and optimal! · example.com �� m.example.com/home - multi-roundtrip penalty for mobile users. · example.com �� www.example.com �� m.example.com - very slow mobile experience.

Avoid Plugins

Google Explanation Plugins help the browser process special types of web content, such as Flash, Silverlight, and Java. Most mobile devices do not support plugins, and plugins are a leading cause of hangs, crashes, and security incidents in browsers that provide support. Due to these concerns, many desktop browsers restrict plugins: · Internet Explorer runs without plugins in Windows UI mode. · Chrome intends to remove support for most plugins. · Firefox will prompt users before running most plugins. Configuring the Viewport Google Explanation A viewport controls how a webpage is displayed on a mobile device. Without a viewport, mobile devices will render the page at a typical desktop screen width, scaled to fit the screen. Setting a viewport gives control over the page's width and scaling on different devices.

Enable Compression

Google Explanation All modern browsers support and automatically negotiate gzip compression for all HTTP requests. Enabling gzip compression can reduce the size of the transferred response by up to 90%, which can significantly reduce the amount of time to download the resource, reduce data usage for the client, and improve the time to first render of your pages

Improve Server Response Time

Google Explanation Server response time measures how long it takes to load the necessary HTML to begin rendering the page from your server, subtracting out the network latency between Google and your server. There may be variance from one run to the next, but the differences should not be too large. In fact, highly variable server response time may indicate an underlying performance issue.

Inline CSS

Google Explanation Modern browsers block on external CSS before painting content to the screen. This incurs additional network latency and increases the time it takes to display content to the screen. To optimize the time to render, if the external CSS resources are small, you can insert those directly into the HTML document. Inlining small CSS in this way allows the browser to proceed with rendering the page.

Leverage Browser Caching

Google Explanation Fetching resources over the network is both slow and expensive: the download may require multiple roundtrips between the client and server, which delays processing and may block rendering of page content, and also incurs data costs for the visitor. All server responses should specify a caching policy to help the client determine if and when it can reuse a previously fetched response.

Minify Resources (HTML, CSS, and JavaScript)

Google Explanation Minification refers to the process of removing unnecessary or redundant data without affecting how the resource is processed by the browser - e.g. code comments and formatting, removing unused code, using shorter variable and function names, and so on.

Optimise Images

Google Explanation Images often account for most of the downloaded bytes on a page. As a result, optimizing images can often yield some of the largest byte savings and performance improvements: the fewer bytes the browser has to download, the less competition there is for the client's bandwidth and the faster the browser can download and render content on the screen.

Optimise CSS Delivery

Google Explanation Before the browser can render content it must process all the style and layout information for the current page. As a result, the browser will block rendering until external stylesheets are downloaded and processed, which may require multiple roundtrips and delay the time to first render. See render-tree construction, layout, and paint to learn more about the critical rendering path, and render blocking CSS for tips on how to unblock rendering and improve CSS delivery.

Reduce the size of the above-the-fold content

Reduce the size of the above-the-fold content browser. For users on networks with high latencies such as mobile networks this can cause significant delays to page loading.

Remove Render Blocking JavaScript

Google Explanation Before the browser can render a page it has to build the DOM tree by parsing the HTML markup. During this process, whenever the parser encounters a script it has to stop and execute it before it can continue parsing the HTML. In the case of an external script the parser is also forced to wait for the resource to download, which may incur one or more network roundtrips and delay the time to first render of the page. See Adding Interactivity with JavaScript to learn more about how JavaScript affects the critical rendering path.

Use Asynchronous Scripts

Google Explanation Using asynchronous scripts means that your page can render more quickly. Instead of forcing users to wait for a script to finish downloading before the page renders, a script can be downloaded in the background. Although most scripts were originally synchronous, newer versions of the scripts have been designed to load asynchronously.

Blocked Resources

Google Explanation If your page has any important resources that are blocked to Googlebot, for instance CSS or image files, it will add a "blocked resources" warning to the results page. For a more accurate test you should unblock these resources for Googlebot, because it is possible that one of these resources could make the page not mobile-friendly (for example, a large image that requires scrolling on the page, or a CSS file that makes the font too small).

Viewport Not Configured

Google Explanation Because visitors to your site use a variety of devices with varying screen sizes— from large desktop monitors, to tablets and small smartphones— your pages should specify a viewport using the meta viewport tag. This tag tells browsers how to adjust the page’s dimension and scaling to suit the device.

Fixed-width viewport

Google Explanation This report shows those pages with a viewport set to a fixed width. Some web developers define the viewport to a fixed pixel size in order to adjust a non-responsive page to suit common mobile screen sizes. To fix this error, adopt a responsive design for your site’s pages, and set the viewport to match the device’s width and scale accordingly. Read how to correctly Set the Viewport in our Web Fundamentals.

Content not sized to viewport

Google Explanation This report indicates pages where horizontal scrolling is necessary to see words and images on the page. This happens when pages use absolute values in CSS declarations, or use images designed to look best at a specific browser width (such as 980px). To fix this error, make sure the pages use relative width and position values for CSS elements, and make sure images can scale as well.

Small Font Size

Google Explanation This report identifies pages where the font size for the page is too small to be legible and would require mobile visitors to “pinch to zoom” in order to read. After specifying a viewport for your web pages, set your font sizes to scale properly within the viewport

Touch Elements Too Close

Google Explanation This report shows the URLs for sites where touch elements, such as buttons and navigational links, are so close to each other that a mobile user cannot easily tap a desired element with their finger without also tapping a neighboring element. To fix these errors, make sure to correctly size and space buttons and navigational links to be suitable for your mobile visitors
There are many terms that are used by search engines and SEO companies. We have tried to put some here for ready use, so to speak. However any you don’t know you can simply google.
Glossary and FAQs
© SEO-CHECKER

Is Page speed important to my google

ranking

The short answer is nobody ( Outside Google ) actually knows. There is all sorts of stuff out there about this and we would encourage you to do your own research. However page speed is up to your hosting, got a good hosting provider then compare your website with a like for like webpage. Remember the more your page has on it the more it has to load. If your hosting provider is cheap then compare and see if it does the job. Also remember that your site is no good if it is always ‘down’. Keep an eye on your website by using a free tool available at uptimerobot.com

Landing Page Redirects

Google Explanation Redirects trigger an additional HTTP request- response cycle and delay page rendering. In the best case, each redirect will add a single roundtrip (HTTP request-response), and in the worst it may result in multiple additional roundtrips to perform the DNS lookup, TCP handshake, and TLS negotiation in addition to the additional HTTP request-response cycle. As a result, you should minimize use of redirects to improve site performance. Here are some examples of redirect patterns: · example.com uses responsive web design, no redirects are needed - fast and optimal! · example.com �� m.example.com/home - multi- roundtrip penalty for mobile users. · example.com �� www.example.com �� m.example.com - very slow mobile experience.

Avoid Plugins

Google Explanation Plugins help the browser process special types of web content, such as Flash, Silverlight, and Java. Most mobile devices do not support plugins, and plugins are a leading cause of hangs, crashes, and security incidents in browsers that provide support. Due to these concerns, many desktop browsers restrict plugins: · Internet Explorer runs without plugins in Windows UI mode. · Chrome intends to remove support for most plugins. · Firefox will prompt users before running most plugins. Configuring the Viewport Google Explanation A viewport controls how a webpage is displayed on a mobile device. Without a viewport, mobile devices will render the page at a typical desktop screen width, scaled to fit the screen. Setting a viewport gives control over the page's width and scaling on different devices.

Enable Compression

Google Explanation All modern browsers support and automatically negotiate gzip compression for all HTTP requests. Enabling gzip compression can reduce the size of the transferred response by up to 90%, which can significantly reduce the amount of time to download the resource, reduce data usage for the client, and improve the time to first render of your pages

Improve Server Response Time

Google Explanation Server response time measures how long it takes to load the necessary HTML to begin rendering the page from your server, subtracting out the network latency between Google and your server. There may be variance from one run to the next, but the differences should not be too large. In fact, highly variable server response time may indicate an underlying performance issue.

Inline CSS

Google Explanation Modern browsers block on external CSS before painting content to the screen. This incurs additional network latency and increases the time it takes to display content to the screen. To optimize the time to render, if the external CSS resources are small, you can insert those directly into the HTML document. Inlining small CSS in this way allows the browser to proceed with rendering the page.

Leverage Browser Caching

Google Explanation Fetching resources over the network is both slow and expensive: the download may require multiple roundtrips between the client and server, which delays processing and may block rendering of page content, and also incurs data costs for the visitor. All server responses should specify a caching policy to help the client determine if and when it can reuse a previously fetched response.

Minify Resources (HTML, CSS, and

JavaScript)

Google Explanation Minification refers to the process of removing unnecessary or redundant data without affecting how the resource is processed by the browser - e.g. code comments and formatting, removing unused code, using shorter variable and function names, and so on.

Optimise Images

Google Explanation Images often account for most of the downloaded bytes on a page. As a result, optimizing images can often yield some of the largest byte savings and performance improvements: the fewer bytes the browser has to download, the less competition there is for the client's bandwidth and the faster the browser can download and render content on the screen.

Optimise CSS Delivery

Google Explanation Before the browser can render content it must process all the style and layout information for the current page. As a result, the browser will block rendering until external stylesheets are downloaded and processed, which may require multiple roundtrips and delay the time to first render. See render-tree construction, layout, and paint to learn more about the critical rendering path, and render blocking CSS for tips on how to unblock rendering and improve CSS delivery.

Reduce the size of the above-the-fold

content

Reduce the size of the above-the-fold content browser. For users on networks with high latencies such as mobile networks this can cause significant delays to page loading.

Remove Render Blocking JavaScript

Google Explanation Before the browser can render a page it has to build the DOM tree by parsing the HTML markup. During this process, whenever the parser encounters a script it has to stop and execute it before it can continue parsing the HTML. In the case of an external script the parser is also forced to wait for the resource to download, which may incur one or more network roundtrips and delay the time to first render of the page. See Adding Interactivity with JavaScript to learn more about how JavaScript affects the critical rendering path.

Use Asynchronous Scripts

Google Explanation Using asynchronous scripts means that your page can render more quickly. Instead of forcing users to wait for a script to finish downloading before the page renders, a script can be downloaded in the background. Although most scripts were originally synchronous, newer versions of the scripts have been designed to load asynchronously.

Blocked Resources

Google Explanation If your page has any important resources that are blocked to Googlebot, for instance CSS or image files, it will add a "blocked resources" warning to the results page. For a more accurate test you should unblock these resources for Googlebot, because it is possible that one of these resources could make the page not mobile-friendly (for example, a large image that requires scrolling on the page, or a CSS file that makes the font too small).

Viewport Not Configured

Google Explanation Because visitors to your site use a variety of devices with varying screen sizes— from large desktop monitors, to tablets and small smartphones— your pages should specify a viewport using the meta viewport tag. This tag tells browsers how to adjust the page’s dimension and scaling to suit the device.

Fixed-width viewport

Google Explanation This report shows those pages with a viewport set to a fixed width. Some web developers define the viewport to a fixed pixel size in order to adjust a non-responsive page to suit common mobile screen sizes. To fix this error, adopt a responsive design for your site’s pages, and set the viewport to match the device’s width and scale accordingly. Read how to correctly Set the Viewport in our Web Fundamentals.

Content not sized to viewport

Google Explanation This report indicates pages where horizontal scrolling is necessary to see words and images on the page. This happens when pages use absolute values in CSS declarations, or use images designed to look best at a specific browser width (such as 980px). To fix this error, make sure the pages use relative width and position values for CSS elements, and make sure images can scale as well.

Small Font Size

Google Explanation This report identifies pages where the font size for the page is too small to be legible and would require mobile visitors to “pinch to zoom” in order to read. After specifying a viewport for your web pages, set your font sizes to scale properly within the viewport

Touch Elements Too Close

Google Explanation This report shows the URLs for sites where touch elements, such as buttons and navigational links, are so close to each other that a mobile user cannot easily tap a desired element with their finger without also tapping a neighboring element. To fix these errors, make sure to correctly size and space buttons and navigational links to be suitable for your mobile visitors